Frontotemporal Dementia Quiz

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Reviewed By:

Shohei Harase, MD

Shohei Harase, MD (Neurology)

Dr. Harase spent his junior and senior high school years in Finland and the U.S. After graduating from the University of Washington (Bachelor of Science, Molecular and Cellular Biology), he worked for Apple Japan Inc. before entering the University of the Ryukyus School of Medicine. He completed his residency at Okinawa Prefectural Chubu Hospital, where he received the Best Resident Award in 2016 and 2017. In 2021, he joined the Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine at the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, specializing in hyperacute stroke.

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How Ubie can help you

With an easy 3-min questionnaire, Ubie's AI-powered system will generate a free report on possible causes.

  • Trained and reviewed by 50+ doctors, our AI Symptom Checker utilizes data from 1,500+ medical centers

  • Questions are customized to your situation and symptoms

  • Frontotemporal Dementia as well as similar diseases can be checked at the same time.

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✔︎  When to see a doctor

✔︎  What causes your symptoms

✔︎  Treatment information etc.

People with similar symptoms also use Ubie's symptom checker to find possible causes

  • Antisocial behavior and language difficulty

  • Prone to turning violent at the smallest provocation

  • Losing my temper and becoming abusive even though it was a small problem

  • Can't say what I want to say

  • Verbally abusive even though it was a small issue

  • Minor provocation causing an excessively violent response

  • Can't recognize letters or words nowadays

Just 3 minutes.
Developed by doctors.

Learn more about Frontotemporal Dementia

Content updated on Jan 19, 2024

What is frontotemporal dementia?

A group of disorders involving the progressive loss of nerve cells in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain (behind your forehead and ears). The brain shrinks and loses function in the affected areas. It can be caused by several conditions that are not fully understood. A family history of dementia increases the risk.

Symptoms of frontotemporal dementia

  • Tendency to do things that are socially unacceptable

  • Speech that does not make sense, or behavior that is strange

  • verbal violence and violence when controlling antisocial behavior

  • Loss of interest in hobbies or leaving the house

  • Perseveration

  • Dressing and behavior has become sloppy, with little regard for what those around might think

  • Lack of interest in surrounding environment

  • Tendency to put random objects in the mouth

Questions your doctor may ask to check for frontotemporal dementia

Your doctor may ask these questions to diagnose frontotemporal dementia

  • Have you engaged in socially unacceptable behavior, like shoplifting or stealing religious offerings?

  • Do others think you speak incoherently or act irrationally?

  • Are you isolating at home and losing interest in your hobbies?

  • Do you think you are less attentive to others?

  • Do you have tendency to put random objects into your mouth?

Treatment for frontotemporal dementia

There is no cure for frontotemporal dementia. However, speech therapy and certain medications have been used to reduce symptoms, as behavior and language can be affected in this condition.

View the symptoms of Frontotemporal Dementia

References

User testimonials

Reviewed By:

Shohei Harase, MD

Shohei Harase, MD (Neurology)

Dr. Harase spent his junior and senior high school years in Finland and the U.S. After graduating from the University of Washington (Bachelor of Science, Molecular and Cellular Biology), he worked for Apple Japan Inc. before entering the University of the Ryukyus School of Medicine. He completed his residency at Okinawa Prefectural Chubu Hospital, where he received the Best Resident Award in 2016 and 2017. In 2021, he joined the Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine at the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, specializing in hyperacute stroke.

From our team of 50+ doctors

Just 3 minutes.
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