Piebaldism Quiz

Check your symptoms and
find possible causes with AI for free

Reviewed By:

Sarita Nori, MD

Sarita Nori, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Sarita Nori was drawn to dermatology because of the intersection of science and medicine that is at the heart of dermatology. She feels this is what really allows her to help her patients. “There is a lot of problem-solving in dermatology and I like that,” she explains. “It’s also a profession where you can help people quickly and really make a difference in their lives.” | Some of the typical skin problems that Dr. Nori treats include skin cancers, psoriasis, acne, eczema, rashes, and contact dermatitis. Dr Nori believes in using all possible avenues of treatment, such as biologics, especially in patients with chronic diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. “These medications can work superbly, and they are really life-changing for many patients.” | Dr. Nori feels it’s important for patients to have a good understanding of the disease or condition that is affecting them. “I like to educate my patients on their problem and have them really understand it so they can take the best course of action. Patients always do better when they understand their skin condition, and how to treat it.”

Yukiko Ueda, MD

Yukiko Ueda, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Ueda graduated from the Niigata University School of Medicine and trained at the University of Tokyo Medical School. She is currently a clinical assistant professor at the Department of Dermatology, Jichi Medical University, and holds several posts in the dermatology departments at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Komagome Hospital, University of Tokyo, and the Medical Center of Japan Red Cross Society.

From our team of 50+ doctors

Please choose the symptom you are most concerned about.

It will help us optimize further questions for you.

By starting the symptom checker, you agree to the Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

Find another symptom

How Ubie can help you

With an easy 3-min questionnaire, Ubie's AI-powered system will generate a free report on possible causes.

  • Trained and reviewed by 50+ doctors, our AI Symptom Checker utilizes data from 1,500+ medical centers

  • Questions are customized to your situation and symptoms

  • Piebaldism as well as similar diseases can be checked at the same time.

Your symptoms

Input your symptoms

Our AI

Our AI checks your symptoms

Your report

You get your personalized report

Your personal report will tell you

✔︎  When to see a doctor

✔︎  What causes your symptoms

✔︎  Treatment information etc.

People with similar symptoms also use Ubie's symptom checker to find possible causes

  • White skin has white hairs growing from it

  • White hair on a patch of white skin

  • Hypopigmentation with white hair

  • Whitish patches on the skin, that enlarge and look like continents on a map

  • Patches of white skin with brown spots inside

  • White hair growing over the patch of white/pale skin

  • White hair growth in the patch of pale/white skin

Just 3 minutes.
Developed by doctors.

Learn more about Piebaldism

Content updated on Nov 2, 2022

What is piebaldism?

A condition characterized by the absence of melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin that gives skin and hair their color. The absence of melanocytes leads to patchy white hair and skin producing the classic "white forelock" on the frontal hairline. This is a genetic disorder, with autosomal dominant transmission. It may increase a person's risk of sunburn and skin cancer.

Symptoms of piebaldism

  • Patches of white skin, that have spots of brown or black within

  • Whitish patches on the skin, that enlarge and look like continents on a map

  • a white spot

Questions your doctor may ask to check for piebaldism

Your doctor may ask these questions to diagnose piebaldism

  • Do you have white spots with brown speckles on your skin?

  • Do you have a big white area (like a country on a map) on your skin?

Treatment for piebaldism

Piebaldism is a benign condition with a stable course that poses mostly a cosmetic concern. Using sunscreen and other protective measures is important to prevent skin damage. Camouflage make up, self-tanning creams are useful. Dermabrasion treatment, where the outer layer of a person's skin is removed, may be helpful. In some cases, melanocyte transplantation, in which pigment-producing cells are transplanted to the affected area, is used to treat this condition.

View the symptoms of Piebaldism

  • Lighter patches of skin

References

  • Oiso N, Fukai K, Kawada A, Suzuki T. Piebaldism. J Dermatol. 2013 May;40(5):330-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.2012.01583.x. Epub 2012 Jun 1. PMID: 22670867.

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1346-8138.2012.01583.x

  • Shah M, Patton E, Zedek D. Piebaldism. 2022 Apr 14. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan–. PMID: 31334958.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK544238/

  • Bassi A, Berti S, Galeone M. Piebaldism. QJM. 2015 Nov;108(11):915. doi: 10.1093/qjmed/hcv101. Epub 2015 May 18. PMID: 25991872.

    https://academic.oup.com/qjmed/article/108/11/915/1904521

User testimonials

Reviewed By:

Sarita Nori, MD

Sarita Nori, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Sarita Nori was drawn to dermatology because of the intersection of science and medicine that is at the heart of dermatology. She feels this is what really allows her to help her patients. “There is a lot of problem-solving in dermatology and I like that,” she explains. “It’s also a profession where you can help people quickly and really make a difference in their lives.” | Some of the typical skin problems that Dr. Nori treats include skin cancers, psoriasis, acne, eczema, rashes, and contact dermatitis. Dr Nori believes in using all possible avenues of treatment, such as biologics, especially in patients with chronic diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. “These medications can work superbly, and they are really life-changing for many patients.” | Dr. Nori feels it’s important for patients to have a good understanding of the disease or condition that is affecting them. “I like to educate my patients on their problem and have them really understand it so they can take the best course of action. Patients always do better when they understand their skin condition, and how to treat it.”

Yukiko Ueda, MD

Yukiko Ueda, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Ueda graduated from the Niigata University School of Medicine and trained at the University of Tokyo Medical School. She is currently a clinical assistant professor at the Department of Dermatology, Jichi Medical University, and holds several posts in the dermatology departments at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Komagome Hospital, University of Tokyo, and the Medical Center of Japan Red Cross Society.

From our team of 50+ doctors

Just 3 minutes.
Developed by doctors.

Ubie is supervised by 50+ medical experts worldwide

Maxwell J. Nanes, DO

Maxwell J. Nanes, DO

Emergency department

Waukesha Memorial Hospital, Waukesha Wisconsin, USA

Caroline M. Doan, DO

Caroline M. Doan, DO

Internal medicine

Signify Health

Benjamin Kummer, MD

Benjamin Kummer, MD

Neurology

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Charles Carlson, DO, MS

Charles Carlson, DO, MS

Psychiatry

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Dale Mueller, MD

Dale Mueller, MD

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Vascular surgery

Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery Associates

Ravi P. Chokshi, MD

Ravi P. Chokshi, MD

Obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN), Critical Care

Penn State Health

View our medical experts