Nephrolithiasis (Kidney Stones) Quiz

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Reviewed By:

Kenji Taylor, MD, MSc

Kenji Taylor, MD, MSc (Family Medicine, Primary Care Physician)

Dr. Taylor is a Japanese-African American physician who grew up and was educated in the United States but spent a considerable amount of time in Japan as a college student, working professional and now father of three. After graduating from Brown, he worked in finance first before attending medical school at Penn. He then completed a fellowship with the Centers for Disease Control before going on to specialize in Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he was also a chief resident. After a faculty position at Stanford, he moved with his family to Japan where he continues to see families on a military base outside of Tokyo, teach Japanese residents and serve remotely as a medical director for Roots Community Health Center. He also enjoys editing and writing podcast summaries for Hippo Education.

Nao Saito, MD

Nao Saito, MD (Urology)

After graduating from Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine, Dr. Saito worked at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Toda Chuo General Hospital, Tokyo Women's Medical University Yachiyo Medical Center, and Ako Chuo Hospital before becoming Deputy Director (current position) at Takasaki Tower Clinic Department of Ophthalmology and Urology in April 2020.

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Learn more about Nephrolithiasis (Kidney Stones)

Content updated on Jan 19, 2024

What is nephrolithiasis (Kidney stones)?

A condition in which stones form in the kidney and may eventually pass through the ureter (tube connecting the kidney and bladder) to the bladder before exiting the urethra. Small stones may pass on their own, but larger stones may need to be removed by procedures or surgery.

Symptoms of nephrolithiasis (Kidney stones)

  • Symptoms started with back pain on one side only

  • Stomach pain or tummy ache in a specific place

  • Diagnosed with Crohn's disease in the past

  • Suspected of CVA tapping pain

  • Back pain worse with exercise

  • Low back pain

  • Back pain

  • Bloody or red urine

Questions your doctor may ask to check for nephrolithiasis (Kidney stones)

  • Was pain on one side of your lower back your first symptom?

  • Is your stomach pain localized to one specific area?

  • Have you been diagnosed with Crohn's disease?

  • Does your back pain worsen after exercising?

  • Do you have lower back pain?

Treatment for nephrolithiasis (Kidney stones)

Treatment depends on the size of the stone. A small stone may pass on its own - patients are asked to drink more water and take painkillers in the meantime. They may also be asked to take a medication to relax the ureters to allow passage of the stone. Larger stones may need procedures like shockwave therapy, which uses sound waves to break up a large stone into smaller pieces that are easily passed. Finally, if the stone is too large surgery may be needed to remove the stone.

View the symptoms of Nephrolithiasis (Kidney Stones)

References

  • Bartges JW, Callens AJ. Urolithiasis. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2015 Jul;45(4):747-68. doi: 10.1016/j.cvsm.2015.03.001. PMID: 26002797.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195561615000467?via%3Dihub

  • Bultitude M. Urolithiasis around the world. BJU Int. 2017 Nov;120(5):601. doi: 10.1111/bju.14033. PMID: 29035016.

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bju.14033

  • Queau Y. Nutritional Management of Urolithiasis. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2019 Mar;49(2):175-186. doi: 10.1016/j.cvsm.2018.10.004. Epub 2018 Dec 21. PMID: 30583809.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195561618301323?via%3Dihub

  • Quhal F, Seitz C. Guideline of the guidelines: urolithiasis. Curr Opin Urol. 2021 Mar 1;31(2):125-129. doi: 10.1097/MOU.0000000000000855. PMID: 33399368.

    https://journals.lww.com/co-urology/Abstract/2021/03000/Guideline_of_the_guidelines__urolithiasis.11.aspx

  • Türk C, Petřík A, Sarica K, Seitz C, Skolarikos A, Straub M, Knoll T. EAU Guidelines on Diagnosis and Conservative Management of Urolithiasis. Eur Urol. 2016 Mar;69(3):468-74. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2015.07.040. Epub 2015 Aug 28. PMID: 26318710.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0302283815006995?via%3Dihub

User testimonials

Reviewed By:

Kenji Taylor, MD, MSc

Kenji Taylor, MD, MSc (Family Medicine, Primary Care Physician)

Dr. Taylor is a Japanese-African American physician who grew up and was educated in the United States but spent a considerable amount of time in Japan as a college student, working professional and now father of three. After graduating from Brown, he worked in finance first before attending medical school at Penn. He then completed a fellowship with the Centers for Disease Control before going on to specialize in Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he was also a chief resident. After a faculty position at Stanford, he moved with his family to Japan where he continues to see families on a military base outside of Tokyo, teach Japanese residents and serve remotely as a medical director for Roots Community Health Center. He also enjoys editing and writing podcast summaries for Hippo Education.

Nao Saito, MD

Nao Saito, MD (Urology)

After graduating from Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine, Dr. Saito worked at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Toda Chuo General Hospital, Tokyo Women's Medical University Yachiyo Medical Center, and Ako Chuo Hospital before becoming Deputy Director (current position) at Takasaki Tower Clinic Department of Ophthalmology and Urology in April 2020.

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