Pale Skin

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Medically Reviewed By:

Sanshiro Kato

Sanshiro Kato, MD

Emergency department

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People with these symptoms also use Ubie's symptom checker to find possible causes

  • Lacking a healthy skin color

  • Face is persistently pale and lips are purplish-blue

  • Face turned pale for a while then recovered

  • Face has no color

  • Face is pale with lips turned blue for a while

  • Facial pallor that lasted for a while

  • Face is ashen all the time

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Content updated on Sep 6, 2022

About the symptom

Paleness can be caused by a lack of blood supply to the skin. It could also be linked to a reduction in the quantity of red blood cells (anemia). The lack of pigment in the skin is not the same as skin pallor. Paleness is linked to blood flow rather than melanin deposition in the skin.

When to see a doctor

Seek professional care if you experience any of the following symptoms

  • Repeated fever above 38 ℃

  • Fainting with loss of consciousness

  • Respiratory wheeze

  • Unexplained weight loss of 5% or more in 1 month

  • Seizure attack

  • Fever

  • Difficulty breathing / breathlessness

  • Peripheral cyanosis

Possible causes

  • Anemia

    Anemia is a disorder in which the body's tissues don't get enough oxygen due to insufficient healthy red blood cells. There are several types anemia with various causes, the most common being iron-deficiency anemia which is a result of insufficient iron. Iron is required to produce haemoglobin, a substance in the red blood cells which help carry oxygen.

  • Meckel's diverticulosis

    Meckel's diverticulum is an outpouching or bulge in the lower part of the small intestine. The bulge is congenital (present at birth) and is a leftover of the umbilical cord.

  • Hypopituitarism

    The pituitary gland is a part of the brain that controls hormone levels in the entire body. In hypopituitarism, this control is disrupted, causing hormone levels to drop and organ function to decrease. Causes include tumors, previous radiotherapy, infections and autoimmunity (body's immune system attacking itself).

Related serious diseases

Questions your doctor may ask about this symptom

Your doctor may ask these questions to check for this symptom

  • Do you look more pale, wan or sickly than usual?

Other Related Symptoms

Similar symptoms or complaints

Symptoms treated by the same specialty

Medically Reviewed By:

Sanshiro Kato

Sanshiro Kato, MD

Emergency department

From our team of 50+ doctors

Just 3 minutes.
Developed by doctors.

Ubie is supervised by 50+ medical experts worldwide

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