Near Syncope

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Reviewed By:

Maxwell J. Nanes

Maxwell J. Nanes, DO (Emergency department)

Sanshiro Kato

Sanshiro Kato, MD (Emergency department)

From our team of 50+ doctors

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People with these symptoms also use Ubie's symptom checker to find possible causes

  • Running or jogging makes my head spin and feel like passing out

  • Could not tolerate the sauna / hot spring and nearly fainted

  • Feels like I am passing out

  • Feeling like about to black out / pass out from standing too long

  • Feeling like about to black out / pass out after running

  • Almost fainted from injections or blood drawing

  • Almost fainted in a warm environment

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Content updated on Sep 6, 2022

About the symptom

It is the sensation of feeling faint without actually losing consciousness.

When to see a doctor

Seek professional care if you experience any of the following symptoms

  • Feeling faint

Possible causes

  • Benign arrhythmias such as extrasystoles

    Arrhythmias are problems with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat, where it might beat too slowly, too fast or with an irregular pattern. Benign arrhythmias are heartbeat irregularities which do not cause any symptoms. Causes include certain medications, caffeine, nicotine, alcohol, cocaine, inhaled aerosols, diet pills, stress, etc.

  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes thick. It is most often caused by genes mutations in the heart muscle. These thickened heart muscles can become stiff, reducing the heart's ability to pump blood adequately.

  • Multiple myeloma (MM)

    This is a cancer of a type of white blood cell in the blood, called a plasma cell. Cancerous cells multiply and "crowd out" other healthy, normal cells. Risk factors include positive family history, older age, and male sex. Symptoms include fatigue, bone pain, weight loss, and inability to fight infections.

Related serious diseases

  • Epilepsy

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder where brain activity becomes abnormal. This can cause seizures of varying lengths of time and severity. Epilepsy can affect people of any age and may occur due to genetic disorders or brain injury such as stroke.

  • Bell's palsy

Questions your doctor may ask about this symptom

Your doctor may ask these questions to check for this symptom

  • Did you ever feel like you were going to faint?

  • Do you have a fever?

  • Do you have headaches or does your head feel heavy?

  • Do you have nausea or vomiting?

  • Have you ever felt dizzy with ringing in the ears (tinnitus) or deafness?

Other Related Symptoms

Similar symptoms or complaints

Reviewed By:

Maxwell J. Nanes

Maxwell J. Nanes, DO (Emergency department)

Sanshiro Kato

Sanshiro Kato, MD (Emergency department)

From our team of 50+ doctors

Just 3 minutes.
Developed by doctors.

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