Hair Loss
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Reviewed By:

Sarita Nori, MD

Sarita Nori, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Sarita Nori was drawn to dermatology because of the intersection of science and medicine that is at the heart of dermatology. She feels this is what really allows her to help her patients. “There is a lot of problem-solving in dermatology and I like that,” she explains. “It’s also a profession where you can help people quickly and really make a difference in their lives.” | Some of the typical skin problems that Dr. Nori treats include skin cancers, psoriasis, acne, eczema, rashes, and contact dermatitis. Dr Nori believes in using all possible avenues of treatment, such as biologics, especially in patients with chronic diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. “These medications can work superbly, and they are really life-changing for many patients.” | Dr. Nori feels it’s important for patients to have a good understanding of the disease or condition that is affecting them. “I like to educate my patients on their problem and have them really understand it so they can take the best course of action. Patients always do better when they understand their skin condition, and how to treat it.”

Yukiko Ueda, MD

Yukiko Ueda, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Ueda graduated from the Niigata University School of Medicine and trained at the University of Tokyo Medical School. She is currently a clinical assistant professor at the Department of Dermatology, Jichi Medical University, and holds several posts in the dermatology departments at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Komagome Hospital, University of Tokyo, and the Medical Center of Japan Red Cross Society.

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Content updated on Dec 10, 2023

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People with similar symptoms also use Ubie's symptom checker to find possible causes

  • I think alopecia areata

  • Poorly demarcated area (fuzzy or unclear border) where the hair is missing

  • Circular bald patches

  • Bald spots with poorly demarcated boundaries

  • New hair stopped growing

  • Hair is coming out

  • Area of bald skin with unclear margins

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About the Symptom

Alopecia is hair loss that can affect the scalp and/areas on the face and body. It can be temporary or permanent and is caused by multiple factors including stress, genetics, medications, age, hormones. Alopecia is the absence or loss of hair on the scalp or the face or body, in an area where it is expected to be present. This condition can be localized or diffuse, temporary or permanent, and can affect both sexes and all age groups. Alopecia is a sign or symptom arising from multiple possible causes, and is broadly classified as nonscarring vs scarring. Some of the causes of hair loss can be stress, hormones, medications, hair styling habits, auto immune diseases and genetics factors.

When to see a doctor

Seek professional care if you experience any of the following symptoms

  • Eye pain

  • Visual field defect

  • Recent weight loss

  • Photophobia

  • Edema

  • Jaundice

  • Abdominal bloating sensation

  • Vomiting of blood

  • Melena (black stools)

Possible causes

Generally, Hair loss can be related to:

  • Male pattern / female pattern hair loss

    A common type of baldness that occurs with age. In males, the hairline recedes along with hair loss on the sides and top of the scalp. In females, the condition is characterized by the progressive loss of hairs over the frontal and top regions of the scalp, causing a visible reduction in hair density. The exact cause is unknown, but hormones and genetics play an important role.

  • Alopecia areata

    An autoimmune disease where the body's immune system attacks hair follicles, causing areas of hair loss that are typically patchy and round in shape.

  • Trichotillomania

    A psychological disorder where a patient feels a strong, irresistible urge to pull out their hair. It can be caused by anxiety, stress, or simply as a habit built up over time.

  • Sheehan's syndrome
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Follicular mucinosis
  • Kerion
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • Erythroderma
  • Zinc / biotin deficiency

Doctor's Diagnostic Questions

Your doctor may ask these questions to check for this symptom:

  • Are you experiencing increased hair loss?

  • Do you have an area of bald skin with unclear edges?

  • Did your scalp itch before hair loss?

  • Is your hairline receding?

  • Is your skin itchy?

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Find Similar Symptoms

Similar symptoms or complaints

References

  • Al Aboud AM, Zito PM. Alopecia. 2023 Apr 16. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan–. PMID: 30844205.

Reviewed By:

Sarita Nori, MD

Sarita Nori, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Sarita Nori was drawn to dermatology because of the intersection of science and medicine that is at the heart of dermatology. She feels this is what really allows her to help her patients. “There is a lot of problem-solving in dermatology and I like that,” she explains. “It’s also a profession where you can help people quickly and really make a difference in their lives.” | Some of the typical skin problems that Dr. Nori treats include skin cancers, psoriasis, acne, eczema, rashes, and contact dermatitis. Dr Nori believes in using all possible avenues of treatment, such as biologics, especially in patients with chronic diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. “These medications can work superbly, and they are really life-changing for many patients.” | Dr. Nori feels it’s important for patients to have a good understanding of the disease or condition that is affecting them. “I like to educate my patients on their problem and have them really understand it so they can take the best course of action. Patients always do better when they understand their skin condition, and how to treat it.”

Yukiko Ueda, MD

Yukiko Ueda, MD (Dermatology)

Dr. Ueda graduated from the Niigata University School of Medicine and trained at the University of Tokyo Medical School. She is currently a clinical assistant professor at the Department of Dermatology, Jichi Medical University, and holds several posts in the dermatology departments at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Komagome Hospital, University of Tokyo, and the Medical Center of Japan Red Cross Society.

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